Demand Cures Today

99¢ of every dollar received goes to fund cancer research

Gateway Funded Cancer Research

The Gateway for Cancer Research funds medical doctors and researchers working in all areas of cancer research. We’re focused on achieving results that help improve the lives of cancer patients TODAY.

We currently fund cancer research in the following areas:

Blood Cancer/Transplantation

Malignancies that attack blood or bone marrow are called hematologic cancer. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 113,000 people were diagnosed with hematologic cancers in 2006 (the most recent year for which we have data). Transplants are common in the treatment of hematologic cancers. The Gateway currently funds three studies in this field:

Title: A Novel Approach for Prevention and Treatment of Chronic Graft-vs.-Host Disease in Allogenic Stem Cell Transplantation

Primary Investigator: Corey Cutler, MD, MPH, FRCP(C) of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Potential Impact: Blood cancer patients often need bone marrow transplantation. The biggest risk is graft vs. host disease. This study hopes to demonstrate that a novel use of monoclonal antibody therapy may lead to the prevention and treatment of steroid-refractory chronic GVHD and increase a patient’s chance of survival. Click here to learn more...

Donate to this Innovator


Title: Adoptive Immunotherapy with Donor Tumor Idiotype-specific T-Cells

Primary Investigator: Larry W. Kwak, MD, PhD of MD Anderson Cancer Center

Potential Impact: This team is developing a novel immune therapy for patients with blood cancers. By transferring highly-enriched populations of specific T-Cells from donor/sibling to recipient, it is expected that the cancer patient will have a stronger immune response, and an increased chance of survival. Click here to learn more.

Donate to this Innovator


Powerful New Tools for Battling Myeloma

Custom vaccines that stimulate the immune systems of cancer patients are being used with success by investigators.  However, vaccines have their own limitations in activating the patient’s T cells to target and eradicate deadly tumor cells. In an effort to give myeloma patients another weapon against cancer, Dr. Avigan and his team at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and the Dana Farber/Harvard Cancer Center, have begun new research to provide patients with an extra cancer-fighting antibody that amplifies the body’s immune response in its quest for a disease-free state.

The Gateway-funded Phase II study involves adults with myeloma who have already completed stem cell transplantation as part of their therapy. Click here to read more...

Title: Blockade of PD-1 in Conjunction with the Dendritic Cell/Myeloma Vaccines Following Stem Cell Transplantation

Primary Investigator: David Avigan, MD of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Potential Impact: Administration of an anti-PD-1 antibody in conjunction with the Dendritic Cell/Myeloma vaccine to elicit anti-tumor responses and disease stabilization.

Donate to this Innovator


Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma

Lymphoma and some types of Leukemia don't seem to respond well to standard forms of treatment. This study expects to find that injecting an immunogenetic compound directly into the lymph nodes of patients will be more effective at reducing cancer cells and increasing anti-tumor immune response in patients. 

Title: Immuno-gene Therapy for Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma

Primary Investigator: Januario E. Castro, MD UCSD Moores Cancer Center

Donate to this Innovator


Brain Cancer

Abnormal cell tissue growth in the brain can result in cancerous brain tumors. The National Cancer Institute estimates that more than 22,000 new cases of brain (and other nervous system) cancers will be diagnosed in the U.S. in 2010. The Gateway currently funds one study in this field:

Title: Predicting Brain Tumor Recurrence from MR Spectroscopy and Diffusion Tensor Imaging

Primary Investigator: Delphine Davis, PhD of University of Rochester Medical Center

Potential Impact: Some types of brain cancer are inoperable and require other types of treatment. Trying to only kill cancer cells through radiation therapy is extremely difficult. Through new technology, this study expects to increase patient survival while decreasing harmful side effects currently associated with radiation by better delineating and predicting the extent of cancer spread around a primary tumor. Click here to read more...

Donate to this Innovator 


Breast Cancer

Breast cancer affects both women and men. The National Cancer Institute estimates that approximately 210,000 people will be diagnosed with the disease in 2010; and almost 40,000 will die from breast cancer. The Gateway currently funds two studies in this field.

Title: Feasibility Trial of Cyclophosphamide-Modulated Vaccination with an Allogenic, GM-CSF-secreting Breast Cancer Vaccine in the Setting of Weekly Trastuzumab Therapy in HER-2/neu-positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

Primary Investigator: Leisha A. Emens, MD, PhD of John Hopkins University

Potential Impact: By combining two vaccines that function differently with a standard chemotherapy regimen, this study hopes to generate a more robust T-cell response in order to shrink existing breast tumors. Click here to learn more...

Donate to this Innovator

 

Title: Unleashing DNA Vaccine to Fight Breast Cancer

Primary Investigators: William E. Gillanders, MD
Professor, Department of Surgery
Washington University School of Medicine

Timothy Fleming, PhD
Research Professor of Surgery
Washington University School of Medicine

Dr. Fleming joined the immunology team at Washington University to develop a vaccine to prime the patient’s immune system to attack breast cancer with the right self-antigen: mammoglobulin-A. The custom vaccine was constructed from DNA segments that encode mammoglobulin-A in order to trigger T cells to recognize the protein as a foreign body on the surface of tumor cells. The vaccine is designed to be especially good at destroying hidden cells not detected by traditional radiation or chemotherapy.

Under the expert direction of William E. Gillanders, MD, the Phase 1 clinical trial is underway, with eight of the 15 patients having finished the series of three injections. Click here to learn more.

Donate to this Innovator


Colon / Colorectal Cancer / Anal Cancer

Cancers that affect the colon, rectum and anus will be diagnosed in almost 148,000 men and women, according to the National Cancer Institute. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says colorectal cancer is the second leading cancer killer in the U.S. The Gateway currently funds three studies in this field:

Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

Title: Two-Step ADAPT Therapy for Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

Primary Investigator: Edward Lin, MD, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle WA

Colorectal cancer is a deadly cancer. The chief cause of failure is due to the presence of cancer stem cells. The cancer stem cells go into hibernation during chemotherapy and 'wake up' when chemotherapy is withdrawn or the tumor cells... Read more....

Donate to this Innovator

 

Title: Targeting Inducible Radioresistance Using Curcumin in Rectal Cancer

Primary Investigator: Sunil Krishnan, MD of MD Anderson Cancer Center

Potential Impact: The combination of standard chemoradiation therapy (CRT) combined with curcumin (found in many spices) may improve a patient’s response to treatment.

Donate to this Innovator

 

Title: Phase II Study for Treatment of Anal HSIL through Use of a Chinese Herbal Topical Cream

Primary Investigator: Misha Cohen, OMD of University of California, San Francisco

Potential Impact: Lesions are often the precursor to anal cancer. A new noninvasive
Chinese herbal topical ointment, AIJP, will treat precancerous anal lesions and may prevent their progression to anal cancer.

Donate to this Innovator

 

Title: Vitamin D Levels in Colorectal Cancer: Prognostic Significance and Preliminary Explorations of Therapeutic Intervention

Primary Investigator: Kathleen Wesa, MD of Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research

Potential Impact: Determine if it is clinically possible to achieve and maintain normal serum Vitamin D levels in patients with metastatic colon cancer on front-line treatment.

Donate to this Innovator


Leukemia/Lymphoma

Leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma will account for approximately 108,000 new cases of cancer in 2010, according to the National Cancer Institute. Leukemia and lymphoma together encompass many different types of cancer. The Gateway currently funds two studies in this field:

Title: CD3 Immunotoxin Therapy of CTCL

Primary Investigator: Arthur E. Frankel, MD of Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Sherwood and Brinkley Foundation

Potential Impact: The new agent molecule seeks and selectively destroys tumor cells with reduced injury to normal tissues compared to chemotherapy.

Donate to this Innovator

 

Title: Immuno-gene therapy for Non Hodgkin Lymphoma using intranodal injection of Ad-ISF35

Primary Investigator: Januario E. Castro, MD of UCSD Moores Cancer Center

Potential Impact: Lymphoma and some types of Leukemia don’t seem to respond well to standard forms of treatment. This study expects to find that injecting an immunogenetic compound directly into the lymph nodes of patients will be more effective at reducing cancer cells and increasing anti-tumor immune response in patients.

Donate to this Innovator


Pancreatic Cancer

The National Cancer Institute estimates that in 2010, approximately 43,000 men and women will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Compared to other cancer types, pancreatic cancer—which is often diagnosed at later stages—has a higher average mortality rate. The Gateway currently funds one study in this field:

Title: Phase I Study of Soluble Lag-3 (Imp321) and Gemcitabine in Patients with Advanced Pancreas Cancer

Primary Investigator: William G. Hawkins, MD of Washington University School of Medicine

Potential Impact: There is evidence that pancreatic cancer cells attract cells from a patient’s immune system that signal “no illness” to the body. This study is using a novel treatment strategy to turn off these “no illness” cells and turn on the immune cells that fight illness, potentially offering a better chance of survival for pancreatic cancer patients.

Donate to this Innovator


Lung Cancer - Non-small Cell

Title: Clinical investigation of combination treatment with an aromatase inhibitor (exemestane) and cardoplatin-based therapy for postmenopausal women with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

Primary Investigator: Richard Pietras, PhD, MD, UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center

Co-Investigators: Edward Garon, MD and Richard Goodglick, PhD, UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center

Summary: The basis for this study is the UCLA discovery that elevated estrogen levels are important fuel which induces lung cancer growth in both men and women. This study aims to stop NSCLC tumor cell proliferation by decreasing estrogen receptor activation and preventing estrogen synthesis. This treatment will be used in conjunction with common chemotherapy regimens pemetrxed and carboplatin. Lung cancers were completely eradicated under this regimen in pre-clinical studies. Read more....

Donate to this Innovator

 

Title: Adjuvant melatonin in prevention of recurrence and mortality following lung cancer resection (AMPLCaRe): A randomized placebo control trial.

Primary Investigator: Dugald Seely, ND, FABNO, Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine

Summary: The aim of this large, two-phased clinical trial is to provide evidence of melatonin’s (MLT) efficacy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer who have undergone surgical resection and its ability to improve the tolerability of chemotherapy and/or radiation. A total of 450 patients will be treated in this study. The first portion of this very comprehensive clinical trial assesses the effects of adjuvant MLT on mortality and quality of life, such as sleep, pain, fatigue, anxiety, etc. The second portion, a phase II substudy , investigates the clinical effects of MLT on immune functioning and inflammatory status, such as NK cells, cytokines, leukocytes and albumin.

Donate to this Innovator


Soft Tissue Sarcomas

Title: Combination Therapy for Soft Tissue Sarcoma

Primary Investigator: Dmitry I. Gabrilovich, MD, PhD
Robert Rothman Endowed Chair in Cancer Research
Head, Section of Dendritic Cell Biology
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute
Professor of Oncologic Sciences and Molecular Medicine
University of South Florida

Soft tissue sarcomas are malignant tumors that develop in fat, muscle, nerves and other tissues throughout the body. Dr. Gabrilovich and his team focused on this rare but deadly disease in a Gateway-funded clinical trial designed to study the effect of a combination of radiation therapy and intratumor injections of dendritic cells (DC) to boost the immune system’s functioning. Study participants had large, soft-tissue sarcomas in their extremities and were not candidates for chemotherapy. As part of the study, they received a regimen of radiation therapy (daily doses given five times per week, Monday-Friday) to shrink the tumors. Click here to read more....

Donate to this Innovator


Quality of Life Cancer Study

Title: Aerobic Exercise For Cancer Patients for Quality of Life

Primary Investigator: Timothy R. Burnham, PhD
Associate Professor, Clinical Physiology, Sport Physiology and Human Anatomy
Central Washington University

Decades ago researchers proved that regular exercise was helpful to recovering cardiac patients. Today cardiac rehabilitation is the standard of care embraced by cardiologists and cardiovascular surgeons everywhere. The same thinking led Dr. Burnham to investigate the effects of exercise on cancer patients after they completed their treatment, with a special focus on reducing post-treatment symptoms and improving quality of life. Common physical side effects that can linger following treatment include loss of muscle, increased body fat, decreased endurance and flexibility, nausea, fatigue and difficulty sleeping. These physical effects are often compounded by anxiety, depression, body image concerns, and an overall decrease in the quality of the patient’s life. 

Through a Gateway-funded clinical trial, Dr. Burnham studied the physical and psychological effects of a supervised exercise and education program conducted with patients who had completed cancer-related surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy or a combination of modalities.  Click here to read more....

Donate to this Innovator


Advanced Malignancies

Title: Study of Water Soluable Curcumine in Advanced Malignancies

Primary Investigators: Siqing Fu, MD, PhD adn Razelle Kurzrock, MD; MD Anderson Cancer Center - Houston, TX

Curcumin is well known for its anti-cancer activities in cancer cells; however, broad clinical implementation has been limited due to poor oral absorption, rapid metabolism and expeditious systemic elimination. This study tests a novel nanotechnology-enhanced curcumine compound dispersed wtih colloidal nano-particles, which enhances bioavailability thirty-fold. In this study, a novel nanotechnologically-enhanced curcumin compound will be used to treat patients with advanced solid tumors where other cancer therapies have failed.  Read more...


The Gateway for Cancer Research also manages three donor-directed funds:

Walter Payton Cancer Fund

The Walter Payton Cancer Fund was founded by his wife, Connie, in memory of his life (he died in 1999 after fighting primary sclerosing cholangitis and bile duct cancer). Mirrored after Walter's own interest in natural healing, the fund supports research with a focus on use of complementary medicine combined with conventional therapies. 


Donate to this Fund

 

Allstate Cancer Research Fund

The Allstate Cancer Research Fund was established in 2004 in cooperation with the Allstate Workplace Division of Allstate Insurance. Allstate employee giving campaigns, fundraising events, and a portion of the company's premiums from the cancer policies it sells, all contribute to the fund. This fund, like the others, supports work to discover better and faster diagnostic methods and more comfortable treatment for cancer patients.

Donate to this Fund

 

Pediatric/Adolescent Cancer Fund

The Pediatric/Adolescent Cancer Fund is privately supported through donations from individuals, corporations and charitable foundations. Its purpose is to support clinically based studies that can make a significant impact on young cancer patients.

Donate to this Fund

Demand Cures Today Cancer Research

More About Our
Research

CANCER FACTS:

Over 289,000 American women will be diagnosed
with breast cancer in 2014.


Nearly 40,000 will die.

Cancer Fact

Demanding it all!
Funding innovative cancer research for
Treatments. Cures. Life.